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Course Descriptions (E-G)

Economics – ECO

ECO 120: Survey of Economics (2-3 cr.) Presents a broad overview of economic theory, history, development, and application. Introduces terms, definitions, policies, and philosophies of market economies. Provides some comparison with other economic systems. Includes some degree of exposure to microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ECO 201: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 cr.) Introduces macroeconomics including the study of Keynesian, classical, monetarist principles and theories, the study of national economic growth, inflation, recession, unemployment, financial markets, money and banking, the role of government spending and taxation, along with international trade and investments. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ECO 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 cr.) Introduces the basic concepts of microeconomics. Explores the free market concepts with coverage of economic models and graphs, scarcity and choices, supply and demand, elasticities, marginal benefits and costs, profits, and production and distribution. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ECO 231: Principles of Money and Banking(3 cr.) Discuss the functions of money in modern economy. Analyzes the evolution and operation of the commercial and central banking systems. Presents developments in monetary theory. Relates theory to policy considerations including government finance and debt management. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Education – EDU

EDU 200: Introduction to Teaching as a Profession (3 cr.) Provides an orientation to the teaching profession in Virginia, including historical perspectives, current issues, and future trends in education on the national and state levels. Emphasizes information about teacher licensure examinations, steps to certification, teacher preparation and induction programs, and attention to critical shortage areas in Virginia. Includes supervised field placement (recommended: 40 clock hours) in a K-12 school. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 24 credits of transfer courses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

Engineering – EGR

EGR 115: Engineering Graphics (2-3 cr.) Applies principles of orthographic projection and multi-view drawings. Teaches descriptive geometry including relationships of points, lines, planes and solids. Introduces sectioning, dimensioning and computer graphic techniques. Includes instruction in Computer Aided Drafting. Lecture 1-2 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4-5 hours per week.
EGR 120: Introduction to Engineering (1-2 cr.) Introduces the engineering profession, professional concepts, ethics, and responsibility. Reviews hand calculators, number systems, and unit conversions. Introduces the personal computer and operating systems. Includes engineering problem solving techniques using computer software. Lecture 0-2 hours per week. Laboratory 0-3. Total 1-4 hours per week.
EGR 125: Introduction to Engineering Methods (3-4 cr.) Applies problem-solving techniques to engineering problems utilizing computer programming and algorithms in a higher level computer language such as FORTRAN, PASCAL, or C++. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.
EGR 140: Engineering Mechanics: Statics (3 cr.) Introduces mechanics of vector forces and space, scalar mass and time, including S.l. and U.S. customary units. Teaches equilibrium, free-body diagrams, moments, couples, distributed forces, centroids, moments of inertia analysis of two-force and multi-force members. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EGR 206: Engineering Economy (2-3 cr.) Presents economic analysis of engineering alternatives. Studies economic and cost concepts, calculation of economic equivalence, comparison of alternatives, replacement economy, economic optimization in design and operation, depreciation, and after tax analysis. Lecture 2-3 hours per week.
EGR 245: Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics (3 cr.) Presents approach to kinematics of particles in linear and curvilinear motion. Includes kinematics of rigid bodies in plane motion. Teaches Newton’s second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum, and problem solving using computers. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EGR 246: Mechanics of Materials (3 cr.) Teaches concepts of stress, strain, deformation, internal equilibrium, and basic properties of engineering materials. Analyses axial loads, torsion, bending, shear and combined loading. Studies stress transformation and principal stresses, column analysis and energy principles. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EGR 260: Circuit Analysis (3 cr.) Covers topics in linear circuit analysis, including basic electrical properties, resistive circuits, network equations, operational amplifiers, network reduction techniques, network theorems, two-port parameters and networks, inductors, capacitors, first-order circuits, second-order circuits and phasor analysis. Prerequisites may be applied locally. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EGR 261: Signals and Systems (3 cr.) Covers topics including Laplace transforms and Laplace transform analysis of circuits, time and frequency domain representation of linear systems, methods of linear systems analysis including convolution and Laplace transforms, frequency domain representation of signals including frequency response, filters, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms. Prerequisites may be applied locally. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EGR 265: Digital Electronics and Logic Design (4 cr.) Teaches number representation in digital systems; Boolean algebra; design of digital circuits, including gates, flip- flops, counters, registers, architecture, microprocessors, input-output devices. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

Electrical Technology – ELE

ELE 135: National Electrical Code: Residential (3-4 cr.) Studies purposes and interpretations of the national electrical code that deals with single and multi-family dwellings, including state and local regulations. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 4-5 hours per week.
ELE 136: National Electrical Code: Commercial (3 cr.) Provides comprehensive study of the purposes and interpretations of national electrical wiring methods, including state and local regulations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.
ELE 140: Basic Electricity and Machinery (4 cr.) Studies direct and alternating current principles, resistors, magnetism, capacitors, protection systems, switches, controls and power distribution for industrial machine shops. Emphasizes test procedures and safety. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.
ELE 156: Electrical Control Systems (3 cr.) Includes troubleshooting and servicing electrical controls, electric motors, motor controls, motor starters, relays, overloads, instruments and control circuits. May include preparation of a report as an out-of-class activity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.
ELE 177: Photovoltaic Energy Systems (4 cr.) Teaches techniques for conduct site surveys, installing system components, installing inverters and performing system sizing and system maintenance. Introduces different battery configurations, and charge controllers. Introduces safety, system design and layout, National Electric Code, Component Selection, wiring and installation techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ELE 211-212: Electrical Machines I-II (4-5 cr. ea) Studies the construction, theory of operations and applications of DC and AC machines. Prerequisite ETR 114 or equivalent. Lecture 3-4 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 6-7 hours per week.
ELE 233-234: Programmable Logic Controller Systems I-II (3-4 cr. ea) Teaches operating and programming of programmable logic controllers. Covers analog and digital interfacing and communication schemes as they apply to system. Prerequisite ETR 156 or equivalent. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.
ELE 245: Industrial Wiring (3 cr.) Teaches the practical applications of industrial and commercial wiring. Includes the principles essential to the understanding of conduit applications and other raceway installations. Includes conduit sizing, cutting, bending, and threading. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

Emergency Medical Services – EMS

EMS 100: CPR for Healthcare Providers (1 cr.) rovides instruction in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation that meets current Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation education for Healthcare Providers. Equivalent to HLT 105.
Lecture 1 hours per week.
1 credits
EMS 111: Emergency Medical Technician Prepares student for certification as a Virginia and National Registry EMT. Focuses on all aspects of pre-hospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for Emergency Medicine Technician. Prerequisite: EMS 100/equivalent Co-requisite: EMS 120.
5 lecture hours; 4 lab hours; 9 hours per week
7 credits
EMS 112-113: Emergency Medical Technician: Basic I-II (4 cr. ea) Prepares student for certification as a Virginia and/or National Registry EMT-Basic. Includes all aspects of pre-hospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for Emergency Medicine Technician Basic. Co-requisite to EMS 120. Prerequisite: CPR certification at the Health Care Provider level. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.
EMS 120: Emergency Medical Technician: Clinical Provides supervised direct patient contact introducing the student to the assessment and emergency care of sick and injured patients. This course is a co-requisite for either EMS 111 or EMS 113, depending upon the program in which the student is participating.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
1 credits
EMS 121: Preparatory Foundations ntroduces fundamental concepts established by the National Emergency Medical Service Education Standards (NEMSES) for Advanced EMT and Paramedic curricula. Includes EMS systems, introduction to research, workforce safety and wellness, EMS system communications, introduction to public health, legal and ethical issues.
Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS
2 credits
EMS 123: EMS Clinical Preparation Introduces the student to local clinical agencies and prepares the student for clinical activities above the level of EMT. Includes prerequisites required by clinical affiliates, therapeutic communication, primary assessment, history taking, secondary assessment, reassessment, monitoring devices and documentation.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS
1 credits
EMS 125: Basic Pharmacology Prepares students to demonstrate competency concerning basic principles of pharmacology, drug dosage calculations and medication administration. Introduces medications listed in the Advanced EMT (AEMT) scope of practice.
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
Prerequisite: Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS Corequisite: EMS 126
1 credits
EMS 126: Basic Pharmacology Lab Focuses on the safe administration of medications in the emergency setting. Includes drug dose calculation and covers multiple routes of administration including oral, intramuscular, subcutaneous, intravenous, and intraosseous and other methods within the scope of practice for the emergency care provider.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisite: Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS Corequisite: EMS 125
1 credits
EMS 127: Airway, Shock and Resuscitation ntroduces concepts associated with pre-hospital emergency care of the individual experiencing airway difficulty or in need of resuscitation or shock management.
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
Prerequisite: Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS Corequisite: EMS 128
1 credits
EMS 128: Airway, Shock and Resuscitation Lab Focuses on specific skills related to airway, resuscitation and shock management.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisite: Current Virginia EMT and CPR certification as approved by the Virginia Office of EMS Corequisite: EMS 127
1 credits
EMS 135:Emergency Medical Care Prepares the student to assess and manage patients with common medical emergencies.
Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 136
2 credits
EMS 136: Emergency Medical Care Lab Focuses on specific skills related to the assessment and management of common medical emergencies.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 135
1 credits
EMS 137: Trauma Care Prepares the student to assess and manage injured patients, developing his/her problem-solving ability in the treatment of trauma involving various body systems.
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 138
1 credits
EMS 138: EMS Trauma Care Lab Focuses on the skills required for the assessment and management of patients with traumatic injury.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 137
1 credits
EMS 139: Special Populations Focuses on the pre-hospital assessment and management of patients in a specific population including pediatrics, geriatrics, obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN), bariatric, abuse, sexual assault and special needs.
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 140
1 credits
EMS 140: Special Populations Lab Develops skills related to the assessment and management of patients in a specific population including pediatrics, geriatrics, obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN), bariatric, abuse, sexual assault and special needs.
Laboratory 2 hour. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 139
1 credits
EMS 141: Cardiovascular Care Focuses on assessment and management of cardiac-related emergencies. Covers basic dysrhythmia recognition and relates it to overall cardiac patient care.
Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite: EMS 142
2 credits
EMS 142: Cardiovascular Care Lab Focuses on skills involved in the assessment and management of cardiac-related
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hour per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128 Corequisite EMS 141
1 credits
EMS 163: Prehospital Trauma Life Support Prepares for certification as a Prehospital Trauma Life Support provider as defined by the American College of Surgeons. Prerequisites: EMS 111 or equivalent.
Lecture 1 hour per week.
1 credits
EMS 164: Advanced Medical Life Support Covers current topics of care for adult patients suffering extensive medical conditions and emergencies, and offers certification as an Advanced Medical Life Support (AMLS) as defined by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT).
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
1 credits
EMS 165: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Prepares for certification as an Advanced Cardiac Life provider. Follows course as defined by the American Heart Association. Prerequisites: EMS 100, 153 or equivalent.
Lecture 1 hour per week.
1 credits
EMS 167: Emergency Pediatrics Course Provides a unique approach to pediatric medical care, offering assessment techniques that can help EMS practitioners rapidly and accurately assess pediatric patients to determine which situations may be life threatening and require immediate intervention. Offers certification as defined by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT).
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
1 credits
EMS 170: ALS Internship I Begins the first in a series of clinical experiences providing supervised direct patient contact in appropriate patient care facilities in and out of hospitals. Includes but not limited to patient care units such as the Emergency Department, Critical Care units, Pediatric, Labor and Delivery, Operating Room, Trauma centers and various advanced life support units.
Laboratory 3-6 hours per week.
1-2 credits
EMS 175: Paramedic Clinical Experience I Introduces students to live patient assessment and management in the clinical setting. Begins a continuum of learning involving live patients that leads to entry-level competence at the paramedic level.
Laboratory 6 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 121, EMS 123, EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128
2 credits
EMS 202: Paramedic Pharmacology Focuses on advanced pharmacological interventions, medications and their effects.
Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 125, EMS 126, EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142
2 credits
EMS 203: Advanced Patient Care Focuses on the comprehensive assessment and management of patients in out-of-hospital and inter-facility scenarios. Content is centered on problem-solving through integration of didactic, psychomotor and affective curricula.
Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142 Corequisite: EMS 204
2 credits
EMS 204: Advanced Patient Care Lab Focuses on the comprehensive assessment and management of out-of-hospital and inter-facility patients using scenario-based learning.
Laboratory 4 hours. Total 4 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142 Corequisite: EMS 203
2 credits
EMS 206: Pathophysiology for Health Professions Focuses on the pathological processes of disease with emphasis on the anatomical and physiological alterations of the human body systems. Includes diagnosis and management appropriate to the advanced health care provider in and out of the hospital environment.
Lecture 3 hours. Total 3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 145 or BIO 141-142 combination
3 credits
EMS 210: EMS Operations Focuses on matters related to Emergency Medical Services (EMS) operations, incident and scene safety and awareness, triage, multiple and mass casualty incident operations and medical incident management (command and control of EMS incidents).
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142
1 credits
EMS 212: Leadership and Professional Development Focuses on the development of leadership within the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS), topics include civic engagement, personal wellness, resource management, ethical considerations in leadership and research.
Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142
1 credits
EMS 213: ALS Skills Development Utilizes reinforcement and remediation of additional advanced life support skills, as needed.
Laboratory 2-4 hours per week.
1-2 credits
EMS 216: Paramedic Review Provides the student with intensive review for the practical and written portions of the National Registry Paramedic exam. May be repeated once, for credit.
Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.
1 credits
EMS 247: Paramedic Clinical Experience II Continues the student experience with live patient assessment and management in the clinical setting. It is the second step in a continuum of learning involving live patients that leads to entry-level competence at the paramedic level.
Laboratory 3 hours. Total 3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142, EMS 175
1 credits
EMS 248:: Paramedic Comprehensive Field Experience Expands the student experience with live patient assessment and management into the field setting. It is the third step in a continuum of learning involving live patients that leads to entry-level competence at the paramedic level.
Laboratory 6 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 135, EMS 136, EMS 137, EMS 138, EMS 139, EMS 140, EMS 141, EMS 142, EMS 175
2 credits
EMS 249: Paramedic Capstone Internship Provides summative evaluation of the Paramedic student in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains.
Laboratory 6 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
Prerequisites: EMS 202, EMS 203, EMS 204, EMS 206, EMS 247, EMS 248
2 credits

Energy Technology – ENE

ENE 100: Conventional and Alternate Energy Application (4 cr.) Provides an overview of hydroelectric, coal, and nuclear energy production methods and renewable solar, geothermal, wind, and fuel cell technology. A complete system breakdown of conventional power production methods, efficiency, and sustainability when compared with solar, geothermal, wind, and fuel cell applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ENE 105: Solar Thermal Active and Passive Technology (4 cr.) Provides a comprehensive study of thermal technology as it applies to collector types and ratings, open-loop versus closed-loop and system sizing. Introduces hydronics, hot water, and pool heating applications. Provides an introduction to fluid dynamics and chemistry as it applies to system installation and maintenance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ENE 220: Wind Power Generation (4 cr.) Studies wind turbines, their location, efficiency, and cost. Covers power generation with wind turbines, storage, conversion to established values, use of batteries, inverters, grid tie systems, and all necessary wiring installations. Prerequisite: ELE 157. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ENE 230: Geothermal Applications (4 cr.) Studies the use of geothermal energy for large and small scale production. Covers the feasibility of heat pump applications for local use on an individual basis. Prerequisite: ELE 157. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

English – ENG

ENG 01-03: Preparing for College Writing I-II (1-6 cr. ea) Helps students discover and develop writing processes needed to bring their proficiency to the level necessary for entrance into their respective curricula. Guides students through the process of starting, composing, revising, and editing. Variable hours per week.
ENG 04-05: Reading Improvement I-II (1-6 cr. ea) Helps students improve their reading processes to increase their understanding of reading materials. Includes word forms and meanings, comprehension techniques, and ways to control reading pace. Variable hours per week.
ENG 100: Basic Occupational Communication (3 cr.) Develops ability to communicate in occupational situations. Involves writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Builds practical skills such as handling customer complaints, writing various types of letters, and preparing for a job interview. (Intended for certificate and diploma students). Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 101-102: Practical Writing I-II (3 cr. ea) Develops writing ability for study, work, and other areas of life with emphasis on occupational correspondence and reports. Guides students in learning writing as a process: understanding audience and purpose, exploring ideas and information, composing, revising, and editing. Supports writing by integrating experiences in thinking, reading, listening, and speaking. Prerequisite ENG 101 prior to ENG 102. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 111-112: College Composition I-II (3 cr. ea) Introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics: develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with at least one researched essay. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 115: Technical Writing (3 cr.) Develops ability in technical writing through extensive practice in composing technical reports and other documents. Guides students in achieving voice, tone, style, and content in formatting, editing, and graphics. Introduces students to technical discourse through selected reading. Prerequisite ENG 111 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 120: Survey of Mass Media (3 cr.) Examines radio, television, newspapers, magazines, books and motion pictures. Emphasizes the nature of change in, and the social implications of, communications media today. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 121-122: Introduction to Journalism I-II (3 cr. ea) Introduces students to all news media, especially news gathering and preparation for print. Prerequisite ENG 111 or 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 210: Advanced Composition (3 cr.) Helps students refine skills in writing non-fiction prose. Guides development of individual voice and style. Introduces procedures for publication. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 211-212: Creative Writing I-II (3 cr. ea) Introduces the student to the fundamentals of writing imaginatively. Students write in forms to be selected from poetry, fiction, drama, and essays. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 241-242: Survey of American Literature I-II (3 cr. ea) Examine American literary works from colonial times to the present, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of our national literature. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 243-244: Survey of English Literature I-II (3 cr. ea) Studies major English works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present, emphasizing ideas and characteristics of the British literary tradition. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 251-252: Survey of World Literature I-II (3 cr. ea) Examines major works of world literature. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 268: The Modern Drama (3 cr.) Studies the modern drama. Emphasizes the understanding and enjoyment of dramatic literature. Requires critical reading and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 278: Appalachian Literature (3 cr.) Examines selected works of outstanding authors of the Appalachian region. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENG 279: Film and Literature (3 cr.) Examines the translation of literature into film viewing and writing. Prerequisite ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Electronics Technology – ETR

ETR 113-114: D.C. and A.C. Fundamentals I-II (3-4 cr. ea) Studies D.C. and A. C. circuits, basic electrical components, instruments, network theorems, and techniques used to predict, analyze and measure electrical quantities. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.
ETR 143-144: Devices and Applications I-II (3-4 cr. ea) Teaches theory of active devices and circuits such as diodes, power supplies, transistors (BJT’S), amplifiers and their parameters, FETs, and operational amplifiers. May include UJT’S, oscillators, RF amplifiers, thermionic devices, and others. Prerequisites: ETR 113 or knowledge of D. C./A. C. theory. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 3-6 hours. Total 5-8 hours per week.
ETR 156: Digital Circuits and Microprocessor Fundamentals (4 cr.) Introduces characteristics and applications of digital logic elements including gates, counters, registers, indicators, and pulse generators. Applies microprocessor theory and applications, including internal architecture interfacing, input/output, memory. Prerequisite: ETR 113. Corequisite: ETR 114. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ETR 235: Optical Electronics (2-3 cr.) Teaches basic optical theory for use with optical fibers. Includes discussion of LEDs, Photodetectors, and other devices for interfacing optical fibers to electronic circuits. Lecture 1-2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3-4 hours per week.
ETR 286- Principles and Applications of Robotics
Provides an overview of terminology, principles, practices, and applications of robotics. Studies development, programming; hydraulic, pneumatic, electronic controls; sensors, and system troubleshooting. Lecture 1-2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3-4 hours per week. 2-3 credits

Environmental Science – ENV

ENV 121: General Environmental Science I (4 cr.) Explores fundamental components and interactions that make up the natural systems of the earth. Introduces the basic science concepts in the discipline of biological, chemical, and earth sciences that are necessary to understand and address environmental issues. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Part I of II.
ENV 170: Fundamentals of Energy Technology (2 cr.) Gives the student an overview of the field of energy conservation and use and provides descriptions of job functions typical to energy technicians. Lecture 2 hours per week.
ENV 193: Studies in Your Role in the Green Environment (1 cr.) Covers new content not covered in existing courses in the discipline. Allows instructor to explore content and instructional methods to assess the course’s viability as a permanent offering. Total 1 to 5 hours per week.
ENV 220: Environmental Problems (3 cr.) Studies the relationship of man to his environment; ecological principles, population dynamics, topics of current importance including air, water, and noise pollution; poisoning and toxicity, radiation, conservation and management of natural resources. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENV 221: Natural Resource Management (4 cr.) Examines environmental aspects of mining and petroleum exploration, management of forest resources, surface and groundwater resource management and alternative energy systems. Familiarizes students with the regulatory environment in mining and exploration and examines case histories of reclamation and remediation projects in both hard rock and fossil fuels. Includes applications such as high yield forestry and renewable energy and examines in light of global sustainability issues and changing economics of oil. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
ENV 227: Environmental Law (2-3 cr.) Introduces environmental law including the history of environmental laws, the National Environmental Policy Act, state environmental acts, hazardous wastes, endangered species, pollution, and surface mine reclamation. Lecture 2-3 hours per week.
ENV 231: Environmental Codes I (3 cr.) Introduces the regulations, their intent, interpretation of the Resources, Conservation, and Recovery Liability Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and similar environmental legislation. Studies their impact on industry. Lecture 3 hours per week.
ENV 290: Coordinated Internship (1-5 cr.) Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Credits/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours.

Equine Management – EQU

EQU 110: Fundamentals of Horse Management (3 cr.) Surveys horse breeds, their functions and uses. Addresses horse conformation facilities, and basic feeds and feedings. Includes study of principles of horse nutrition. Lecture 3 hours per week.
EQU 137: Equine Facilities Management (3 cr.) Introduces the design and maintenance of horse facilities to include construction considerations in the areas of equipment selection, pasture management, and breeding. Introduces stable building and maintenance, as well as jump construction. Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week.

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Financial Services – FIN

FIN 110: Principles of Banking (3 cr.) Presents nearly every aspect of banking, providing a comprehensive introduction to the diversified services and operations of the banking industry. Focuses on new trends gaining attention in banking circles. Recommended for all banking students. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FIN 215: Financial Management (3 cr.) Introduces the process of identifying and solving financial problems confronting the business enterprise. Includes topics such as the basic tools of financial analysis, working capital, capital budgeting, and long-term financing. Uses problems and cases to enhance skills in financial planning and decision making. Prerequisite ACC 211 or Division approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

 

Fire Science Technology – FST

FST 100 - Principles of Emergency Services (3 cr.) Provides an overview to fire protection; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; philosophy and history of fire protection/service; fire loss analysis; organization and function to public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 110 - Fire Behavior and Combustion (3 cr.) Explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 112 - Hazardous Materials Chemistry (3 cr.) Provides basic fire chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials including problems of recognition, reactivity, and health encountered by firefighters. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 115 - Fire Prevention (3 cr.) Provides fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and life-safety education. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 120 - Occupational Safety and Health for the Fire Service (3 cr.) Introduces the basic concepts of occupational health and safety as it relates to emergency service organizations. Includes risk evaluation and control procedures for fire stations, training sites, emergency vehicles, and emergency situations involving fire, EMS, hazardous materials, and technical rescue. (Upon completion of this course, students should be able to establish and manage a safety program in an emergency service organization. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 205 - Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (3 cr.) Provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 220 - Building Construction for Fire Protection (3 cr.) Provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. Focuses on firefighter safety. Covers the elements of construction and design of structures and how they are key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. Lecture 3 hours per week.
FST 235 - Strategy and Tactics (3 cr.) Provides an in-depth analysis of the principles of fire control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. Lecture 3 hours per week.

 

Forestry – FOR

FOR 125: Forest and Fire Control (1 cr.) Examines forest fire behavior. Includes factors causing ignition and spread, methods of fire prevention and pre suppression, and forest fire control organizations. Lecture 1 hour per week.
FOR 135: Wildlife and Fisheries Management (4 cr.) Introduces the principles of wildlife and fisheries management. Emphasizes practices in the eastern United States. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
FOR 211: Wildlife Investigational Techniques I (3 cr.) Teaches techniques used in wildlife management research including the capturing, sexing, aging and marking of wild animals. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.
FOR 245: Forest Products (2 cr.) Introduces forest products. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
FOR 298: Seminar and Project (3 cr.) Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student's occupational objectives and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field.

 

French – FRE

FRE 101-102: Beginning French I-II (4-5 cr. ea) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic French sentence structure. Lecture 4-5 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.
FRE 201-202: Intermediate I-II (3-4 cr. ea) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Prerequisite French 102 or equivalent. Lecture 3-4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

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Geographic Information Systems – GIS

GIS 200-201: Geographical Information Systems I-II (4 cr. ea) Provides hands-on introduction to a dynamic desktop GIS (Geographic Information System). Introduces the components of a desktop GIS and their functionality. Emphasizes manipulation of data for the purpose of analysis, presentation, and decision-making. Prerequisites: ITE 115 or ITE 119 or instructor approval. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.
GIS 205: GIS 3-Dimensional Analysis(4 cr.) Introduces GIS 3D (three-dimensional) concepts and practices with a concentration on displaying, creating and analyzing spatial GIS data using 3D. Covers 3D shape files, 3D data formats such s Tins, DEMs, grids and controlling the perspective and scale of 3D data through rotating, panning and zooming. Prerequisite: GIS 201. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.
GIS 210: Understanding Geographic Data (4 cr.) Provides the student an introduction to geographic data and the principles behind their construction. Introduces the concepts for measuring locations and characteristics of entities in the real world. Exposes the student to the limitations and common characteristics of geographic data. Prerequisite: GIS 201. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

 

Geography – GEO

GEO 200: Introduction to Physical Geography (3 cr.) Studies major elements of the natural environment including early sun relationship, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation and soils. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Lecture 3 hours per week.
GEO 220: World Regional Geography (3 cr.) Studies physical and cultural characteristics of selected geographical regions of the world. Focuses upon significant problems within each of the regions, and examines the geographical background of those problems. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Lecture 3 hours per week.

 

Geology – GOL

GOL 105: Physical Geology (4 cr.) Introduces the composition and structure of the earth and modifying agents and processes. Investigates the formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, earthquakes, and crustal deformation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.
GOL 106: Historical Geology (4 cr.) Traces the evolution of the earth and life through time. Presents scientific theories of the origin of the earth and life and interprets rock and fossil record. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

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